Sunday, May 28, 2006

William Jefferson may lead the Pelosi revolution

I've always been amused by Democrats frothing at the mouth, year after year, about how this is their time and they are going to sweep into power in the Fall. Watching them try to pin the "culture-of-corruption" label on Republicans has been very entertaining. However there is finally a corruption scandal that may well sweep the Democrats into power in the House this time. In a script that could only be written in Hollywood or come to life in Washington, William Jefferson (D-LA) may well do it. The ridiculous position taken by House Republicans, led by Denny Hastert, that Congress is above the law will do more to turn off Republican voters than any perceived GOP scandal. When you couple that with the fact Democrats will have to quit barking "corruption", which only served to energize the Republican base anyway, you have the recipe for a huge electoral victory for the party of asses this year.

Fortunately for the rest of us in the real world there is time to recover. Memo to Speaker Hastert: You had better go hardline on border enforcement and it would be a good idea to quietly compromise with the Justice department.

Let's see how Mark Steyn views this:

Which current member of the Republican Party's creme de la creme could utter that Reagan line and mean it? Take the speaker of the House, J. Dennis Hastert. Last week, something very unusual happened: There was a story out of Washington that didn't reflect badly on the Republican Party's competence or self-discipline. It was about a Democrat! Fellow from Louisiana called William Jefferson. Corruption investigation. Don't worry, if you're too distracted by "American Idol," it's not hard to follow, you just need to know one little visual image: According to an FBI affidavit, this Democrat congressman was caught on video taking a hundred-grand bribe from a government informer and then storing it in his freezer. That's what the scandal's supposed to be: Democrat Icecapades of 2006. All the GOP had to do was keep out of the way and let Jefferson and his Dem defenders skate across the thin ice like Tonya Harding with her lumpy tights full of used twenties. It was a perfect story: No Republicans need be harmed in the making of this scandal.

So what does Hastert do? He and the House Republican leadership intervene in the case on behalf of the Democrat: They're strenuously objecting to the FBI having the appalling lese majeste to go to court, obtain a warrant and search Jefferson's office. In constitutional terms, they claim it violates the separation of powers. In political terms, they're climbing right into the Frigidaire with Jefferson's crisp chilled billfold. What does the Republican base's despair with Congress boil down to? That the Gingrich revolutionaries have turned into the pampered potentates of pre-1994 Washington, a remote insulated arrogant elite interested only in protecting the privileges of the permanent governing class. But how best to confirm it? Hmm. What about if we send the Republican speaker out to argue that congressmen are beyond the jurisdiction of U.S. law-enforcement agencies?

Comments:
RW:

I gotta tell 'ya. When I saw Hastert's response to this, I was aghast. I thought...maybe his motives were that there had been so many implications of wrongdoing by GOP congressmen played out in the press even before the trial began, that he chose a democrat to protect from the pre-emptive strike
making it look bipartisan. Who the hell knows, but I agree, it may have backfired.

Where's Newt?

Crap, the husband is rushing me, I hope my thought is coherent. I hate it when he does this.
 
All the GOP had to do was take six steps back and watch the fireworks. It would have been a long, extravagant and painful (for Democrats) show.

Is the Republican leadership trying to throw the fall elections?
 
Fat Hasturd is corrupt. Why would he do such a thing?

My guess is the documents show corruption from the ways and means committee Jefferson is in. Katrina funds. So much money, such a big temptation. They just can't help themselves.
 
RW,

I reached the same conclusion a long time ago. It was in the middle of the energy crisis out here when Cheney, with the advice of Ken Lay, came out to the left coast and pronounced that everything was fine and the free market would fix it all. That gave Enron the go ahead to loot another couple of billion from left coast citizens until the whole ball of wax started to unravel. To add insult to injury, the feds are even now fighting the local utility districts in court to make them pay on contracts for electricity made while the rigged "free market" was operating. Those contracts were made under duress during a fraudently created "shortage." As far as I am concerned, both parties suck, but the Republicans want to take us back to the days of the robber barons.
 
Anyhoo! Some over at ml's have already theorized that when Bush asked that the documentation of the FBI's investigation be secured, it makes the Republicans look like they have something to hide. Don'tcha just love politics under pressure. If there's an opening, rush in without anticipating how it may benefit you're opponent.

Have a great Memorial Day.
 
OO,

Hastert better give this fight up fast or it's going to seem like the conspiratorial moonbats...(like getalife)...are right. Even Dick Durbin says he doesn't see any separation of powers issue.

getalife,

Tell us where all that levee board money went for the last few decades.

Seneca,

There's always a chance that Hastert knows this is the tip of the Demo/corruption iceberg and wanted to act like he was standing up for a member.
 
WashingtonState,

It would be a little difficult for you to have come to the same conclusion a long time ago as you put it.

First off my conclusion is that there is time to repair this damage and while things look bad for Republicans right now the game is in no way over.

I also am using an entirely different set of circumstances. If I was using the tired old Cheney/Enron connection I would say Republicans were in no danger whatsoever. Keep in mind my argument is that Democrats can only sweep into power if conservative Republican voters get apathetic. They aren't going to decide that Republicans aren't conservative enough and then go vote for Democrats.

Happy Memorial Day everyone! I will put up a post for the observance and then we will be heading back to the big city Tuesday.
 
RW,

...(like getalife)...are right.

Have you not figured out I am always right?

Well, sometimes left.
 
Tag.... you're it!
 
RW,

This is the part I agree with and came to the same conclusion as:

"What does the Republican base's despair with Congress boil down to? That the Gingrich revolutionaries have turned into the pampered potentates of pre-1994 Washington, a remote insulated arrogant elite interested only in protecting the privileges of the permanent governing class."

Enron/Cheney is not tired and old out here where some of the PUDs are trying to get out of ruinous contracts signed at the height of the manufactured energy crisis only to have the feds step into the fray and try and hold them to the those contracts.
 
RW,

I won't dismiss your idea that Hastert has a grand plan. Not all Republicans are dumb.

WashingtonState,

An interesting perspective. Ken Lay may be prison bound, but the damage done by Enron still lingers.
 
Seneca,

Not only that, but the people hurt by the Enron affair have been largely ignored. Lay is going down for some SEC violations, not for his manipulations of the energy market. For companies dealing with energy, it is business as usual under the protection of congress and a friendly president. The irony is that we have been here before:
" In the 1930s, a character named Samuel Insull created the first giant power holding companies. Insull played fast and loose with his account books, fast and loose with cash for politicians and pocketed millions by gouging electricity customers. Insull was indicted, like Lay, for crimes against his stockholders.

In 1933, President Roosevelt made Insull's power piracy a crime. FDR signed the Public Utility Holding Company Act and laws that capped the profit of electricity monopolies. The act required them to keep lights on by accounting for all maintenance expenses, barred "trading" electricity and, most important, banned donations by the power giants to politicians."

"Fast-forward to January 2001. The George W. Bush administration, within 72 hours of his inauguration, issued an executive order lifting the Clinton Energy Department's effective ban on speculative trading in the California power market. The state was still in crisis, facing blackouts and 300 percent increases in power bills, the result of "deregulating" its electric system, as first suggested by Lay."
 
sorry rw,
i am not fast enough for this topic! all i do know is i paid those elevated prices a few years back and they never really seemed to go down a whole lot. we still pay between $200-350. a month.
 
WashingtonState & mgc,

I'm only talking about Enron and the connection to Cheney being a tired old story as it relates to a national political change. I don't mean to imply that there is nothing to the issue of energy prices.

In your local areas it may well be a driving force for years to come, as it may be in Houston. Whether that means people hold it against individual Republicans is still up in the air even in your areas, but it is not an issue that will create a political upheaval nationwide.
 
getalife,

Are you "Le Trole"?

El Patro,

I am just about to wrap up three weeks of vacation. It's not really the best time to do a list of simple pleasures, I'm a walking, talking simple pleasure factory right now. I'll hang on to it for awhile.

Seneca,


My idea of Hastert having a grand plan is much more wishful thinking than a real idea.
 
RW,

With gas prices where they are and the cost of heating a home where it is, energy prices are a huge national issue. I hate to be a cynic, but I bet the price of gas at the pump and the cost of the monthly heating (or air conditioning) bill will be major determinants in this election. I don't think that is entirely fair, but our president has aligned himself squarely with the energy business and in many people's minds, he is somehow to blame for these costs. It doesn't help when you look at his advisory councils and see them packed with representatives of those businesses. Cheney also has been unapologetic about his close ties to these folks. Sometimes being right isn't enough.
 
Hastert looks like a complete fool for doing it....

This Republican compulsion to fall on their swords in order to protect corrupt Democrats has got to stop. I like masochism as much as the next girl, but this is ridiculous...
 
WashingtonState,

This appears to be one of those things we will have to agree to disagree on. I guess we will find out in November.

Sonia,

There's a big difference between a little good time masochism and full on stupidity. After this weekend I think Hastert will come to his senses.
 
Post a Comment

Links to this post:

Create a Link



<< Home

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?